Category Archives: Healthy

A Wellness Journal for Your Best, Healthy Life

A wellness journal can be important in achieving your goals.

The use of a journal can help to Clear the mind, allow for Self-reflection and Emotional expression, Provide accountability, Reduce stress, and improve overall Problem-solving.  It can be supportive of personal growth and may lead to a greater sense of empowerment in one’s life.

It is also considered an inexpensive form of self-care!

Writing therapy with the use of a journal has been used in a range of scenarios related to overall health and wellness.  Essentially what can make journaling supportive to health is when it is leveraged in a concerted way.  More on this can be found through PositivePsychology.com under “writing therapy”.  Also, a brief synopsis on the history of journal writing as a form of therapy is available from the Center for Journal Therapy.

In scientific studies, various associations between creative expression and health outcomes have been observed.

Self-reflection exercises, such as those that can be applied through the use of a journal, have been used to support people in overcoming grief or trauma.  The rationale behind this is that expressive writing can help people to acknowledge traumatic events, organize thoughts, and, then, help them to make sense of things.  Essentially, it is a way to learn from the experience and move forward.  Experts in this area point out the need to find the right amount of time spent on journaling vs. over-reliance on the tool which could result in rumination.

Studies that have focused on people with chronic health conditions have shown improvements in overall well-being even if the act of journaling was only once a week.  Furthermore, there has been some evidence to suggest the simple act of using a journal can boost the immune system and, therefore, benefit health overall.  This could have been a bi-product resulting from stress reduction.

Improving immune health is especially relevant when health conditions have been diagnosed.  

For general wellness and personal growth, journals can be used to create healthy habits.  A few ways in which a journal is supportive for goal setting and forming habits include;

  • Definition and visualization of goals
  • Organization of information and supportive details
  • A catalyst to plan necessary steps and your time
  • Leverage of self-accountability and check-ins

Furthermore, the use of a journal can be a great way to notice patterns in your behavior and possible triggers that throw you off track.

When incorporating health and wellness into your journal, you can also use sections to monitor Food and Water intake, Sleep or fatigue, Exercise, Self-care, and factors or symptoms associated with a health condition.

Using a wellness journal is not only a good way to plan out your favorite healthy activities, but also to draft and track other personal goals, such as those related to Productivity, Altruism or Volunteerism, and/or Relationships.

In my wellness practice, I leverage a symptoms journal approach that also incorporates factors related to well-being.  It never ceases to amaze me how quickly participants will notice something they hadn’t before completing the journaling exercise.  Recently, I added a simple journal tool for general health and wellness.  It is conveniently named Live Your Best, Healthy Life!

Photo credit(s):  Wellness Stock Shop

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Sources:

Ackerman, C.E.  (2019, Nov 20).  Writing Therapy:  Using a Pen and Paper to Enhance Personal Growth.  PositivePsychology.com.  Retrieved from https://positivepsychology.com/writing-therapy/.

Baikie, K.A. and Wilhelm, K.  (2005, Sep).  Emotional and Physical Health Benefits of Expressive Writing.  Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 11(5), 338-346.

Center for Journal Therapy  (n.d.).  A Brief History of Journal Writing.  Retrieved from https://journaltherapy.com/get-training/short-program-journal-to-the-self/journal-to-the-self/journal-writing-history/.

Murray, B.  (2002, Jun).  Writing to Heal:  By Helping People Manage and Learn from Negative Experiences, Writing Strengthens Their Immune Systems As Well As Their Minds.  American Psychological Association, Monitor on Psychology, 33(6), 54.

O’Connor, M.  (n.d.).  Evidence of the Healing Power of Expressive Writing.  The Foundation for Art and Healing, The UnLonely Project.  Retrieved from https://artandhealing.org/evidence-of-the-healing-power-of-expressive-writing/.

Pennebaker, J. W. and Smyth, J.M.  (2016).  Opening Up by Writing it Down:  How Expressive Writing Improves Health and Eases Emotional Pain, (3rd edition), New York, NY:  The Guilford Press.

Smyth, J.M., Stone, A.A., Hurewitz, A., and Kaell, A.  (1999, Apr 14).  Effects of Writing About Stressful Experiences on Symptom Reduction in Patients with Asthma or Rheumatoid Arthritis:  A Randomized Trial.  Journal of American Medical Association, 281(14), 1304-09.

3 Simple Ways to Improve both Mental and Physical Health (plus bonus tips)

“Mental health and physical health have a bi-directional and complex relationship” (Bhugra, Kar, and Lawton-Smith, 2014). 

Essentially what that alludes to is how our thought patterns, feelings, and attitudes can influence certain things in the physical realm, such as biological factors and outcomes, just as what we do physically can influence our mental state. The landscape for this topic is further entangled by various social factors.  Studies on the neuroscience involved with the tight connections between mental and physical health are emerging and the findings have been compelling.    

In a nutshell, the intricate dance between mental and physical health plays a significant role in our overall health and sense of well-being.  While it’s easy to get caught up with visuals and images of fit, tone bodies as a representation of good health.  It is also important to keep the health of our mind in check which also takes consistent “exercise”.

The good news is that there are ways to manage both mental and physical health in tandem throughout the year.

Pick a physical activity plan right for you with a focus on consistent daily movement and conditioning.

Movement improves circulation and, respectively, blood flow to the brain.  There is also a co-dependent relationship between physical activity and stress levels.  Appropriate daily movement can help reduce adverse stress levels which can lead to better mental clarity and focus.  Furthermore, exercise can also serve as a moving meditation allowing for concentration on the patterns of movement.  Each of these factors, physical activity and stress levels, influences how we sleep which is incredibly relevant for cognition and certain biochemical facets related to the health of our brain.

Bottom line:  stay physically active for both mental and physical health.

Bonus tip:  Lift weights to reduce anxiety!  Not only is weight-bearing exercise fantastic for your physique, including internal components such as bone health, but it can also be great for mental health as well.

Check-in on your mental patterns and habits. 

Destructive mental habits, such as repetitive self-pity or ruminating, can essentially hijack positive motivations.  When this occurs, it may prevent taking relevant action when doing so is needed the most.  It can also influence our health-related behaviors and outcomes, as well as relationships with others.

Working to re-prioritize mental tendencies and maladaptive behaviors to, then, focus on the proactive practice of more healthful patterns can enhance emotional well-being.  Furthermore, studies have suggested, for example, that exercises for mindfulness can be a helpful antidote to negative mental tendencies such as rumination.

Bottom line:  clearing negative, adverse mental patterns can positively influence a sense of well-being and lead to a greater sense of motivation which is critical when it comes to taking care of both mental and physical aspects of health.

Bonus tip:  Identifying and repositioning mental habits is also an area where a mentor or appropriate supportive professional can help with identify realistic and actionable steps for change, then support for staying on track.

Pay attention to breathing patterns and consider targeted approaches.

Appropriate breathing patterns are important during exercise and they can also play a role within the day to day through the activation of the relaxation response.  Targeted breathing patterns, such as mechanisms of deep breathing, are also thought to help improve blood flow, relax muscles, support metabolism, regulate the immune system, and reduce stress levels.  Incorporating targeted approaches to breathwork has not only been shown to support various mental related conditions, such as anxiety or depression, but it has also been influential in chronic medical conditions that may be impairing physical health.  Furthermore, the practice of yoga has been touted for its emphasis on breathing and physical conditioning.

Bottom line:  breathing techniques can be supportive of both mental and physical health, particularly due to the reduction of adverse, elevated stress levels.

Bonus tip:  Harvard Health provides a simple, implementable approach HERE.

Final thoughts

Winding down through methods such as spending time in nature or taking a “digital detox” can also be influential to both mental and physical health.  Also, general wellness, including nutrition, is supportive.

In closing, the focus of mind-body connections is emerging in emphasis.  Although certain principles have been around in sort of old-world wisdom for centuries, new research in areas such as neuroscience is further confirming the various connecting facets.

A solid, “whole-health” approach is to exercise both the mind and body.

Photo credit(s):  Jacob Postuma on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Sources:

Bhugra, D., Kar, A., and Lawton-Smith, S. (2014, Jun).  Integration of Mental and Physical Health Services: Lessons.  Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Mental Health 1(1), 15-21.

Cherry, K. (2019, Sep 30).  Reasons to Do a Digital Detox?  Verywell Mind.  Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/why-and-how-to-do-a-digital-detox-4771321.

Chopra Center, The. (2018, Oct 24).  How Breathwork Benefits the Mind, Body, and Spirit.  Retrieved from https://chopra.com/articles/how-breathwork-benefits-the-mind-body-and-spirit.

Connor, P. J., Herring, M. P., and Caravalho, A. (2010, May 7).  Mental Health Benefits of Strength Training in Adults.  American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 4(5), 377-396.

Gordon, B. R., McDowell, C. P., Lyons, M., and Herring, M.P. (2017, Dec).  The Effects of Resistance Exercise Training on Anxiety:  A Meta-analysis and Meta-regression Analysis of Randomized Control Trials.  Sports Medicine, 47(12), 2521-2532.

Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley. (n.d.).  Mindfulness|Defined.  Retrieved from https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition.

Harvard Health (2018, Apr 13).  Relaxation Techniques:  Breath Control Helps Quell Errant Stress Response.  Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/relaxation-techniques-breath-control-helps-quell-errant-stress-response.

Kleckner, I. R., et al. (2017, Apr 24).  Evidence for a large-scale brain system supporting allostasis and interoception in humans.  Nature Human Behaviour, 1 (0069).

Madell, R. (2016, Mar 14).  Exercise as Stress Relief.  Healthline.  Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/exercise-stress-relief#1.

Palma, Z. (2019, Aug 12).  What is Breathwork and Does It Work?  Parsley Health Articles.  Retrieved from https://www.parsleyhealth.com/blog/breathwork-does-it-work.

Rupprecht S., Walach H. (2016).  Mindfulness at Work: How Mindfulness Training May Change the Way We Work.  In: Wiencke M., Cacace M., Fischer S. (eds) Healthy at Work, (311-327).  Switzerland:  Springer International Publishing.

Sartini-Cprek, N. (2017, Apr  12).  The Mind-Body Connection:  How Mental and Physical Wellness Are Linked.  Good Therapy Blog.  Retrieved from https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/mind-body-connection-how-mental-physical-wellness-are-linked-0412174.

Semeco, A. (2017, Feb 10).  The Top 10 Benefits of Regular Exercise.  Healthline.  Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-benefits-of-exercise.

Sultanoff, B. A. (2002).  Breath Work.  In: Shannon, S. (eds) Handbook of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Mental Health, (209-227).  Elsevier, Inc.

Vago, D. R. (2014, Jan).  Mapping Modalities of Self-Awareness in Mindfulness Practice:  A Potential Mechanism for Clarifying Habits of Mind.  Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1307(1), 28-42.

Verplanken, B. and Fisher, N. (2014, Oct).  Habitual Worrying and Benefits of Mindfulness. Mindfulness, 5566–573.

Verplanken, B., Friborg, O., Wang, C. E., Trafimow, D., & Woolf, K. (2007).  Mental habits: Metacognitive reflection on negative self-thinking.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92(3), 526–541.

US Department of Health and Human Services|National Institutes of Health. (n.d.).  Why Should Scientists Study Neuroscience?  Retrieved from https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/neuro/conditioninfo/study.

Your health and stress: What you can do

It’s not uncommon to have some awareness of the impact of stress on health, yet not really know what to do about it.

There are, in fact, several things we can do within our daily lives to reduce stress and, therefore, create a more balanced and well life.  It is also intriguing that there are some favorable outcomes from certain levels of stress which I’ll highlight further in this post.

I do want to point out that when I’m talking about reducing stress, I am referring to “adverse” stress.  In layman’s terms, this could be considered the “bad” stress.

Self-care is one of the most basic approaches to stress management.

Yep, it’s actually rather simple.  Take care of yourself in a holistic manner and you can pretty much bet on less physical, mental, and emotional stress.

What does that mean???

At a base level, I am talking about healthfulness in terms of food and diet, physical activity, conditioning the mind, relationships, spiritual or connection to purpose, and engagement with finances.  Some people may recognize this as the dimensions of wellness.

Thinking more comprehensively is when we get to pull it all together in a way that brings us balance despite the various ebbs and flows we will encounter.  Furthermore, recognizing that this will take a proactive approach to how we go about life and respond to circumstances as they arise.

For a few examples of specific self-care practices, be sure to check out this article from Very Well Mind, 5 Self-Care Practices for Every Area of Your Life.

Bottomline; prioritize the care of your health and overall wellness to also reduce the likelihood of heightened, chronic adverse stress.

If you are looking for a therapeutically oriented approach with notable evidence to back it up, then Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is likely for you.  This may also fall under Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).

The term mindfulness may seem a little elusive.  I have seen it explained as anything from “relaxing the mind” to something such as “openness to experience with grounding in the body” which can likely have a wild range of interpretations for meaning.

A textbook definition hones in on self-awareness and recognition for how one responds to circumstances while in the specific moment(s) in which they arise.

In research, which mostly falls under Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in fields such as psychology,  we have observed that certain shifts in the mindset paired with an emphasis on practicing self-compassion have been positively correlated to stress reduction.  Studies have also shown compelling information with regards to a reduction in feelings of “burn out”.

Furthermore, the reduction of adverse stress in our daily lives has been considered with regards to the quality of life factors, such as productivity, health outcomes, leisure and social interactions, and certain socio-economic aspects.

Meanwhile, meditation practices have been around for centuries and are often relied upon for the management of stress.  In fact, if you run a web search on mindfulness or self-care for that matter, many of the results for exercises to complete will include meditation as a suggestion.

With a significant emphasis on breathwork, meditative practices are considered mind-body therapies.  Breathing practices can help disengage the brain from negative responses, such as mind racing, and bring a greater sense of focus.

Furthermore, there is a connection with breathing patterns to the nervous system.  Approaches considerate of this, such as meditation exercises, are thought to relax the nervous system.  This can help bring the body out of a heightened response state and, therefore, reduce excess stress response as well as other respective adverse effects such as consequences to the immune system.

Studies of brain mechanisms and meditation are emerging, but we are seeing much more integration of meditation into both professional and social settings centered on wellness or well-being and certain clinical care settings.

Finally, a somewhat unique, emerging option is Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT).  Admittedly, when I first started hearing hype about this approach, I was a bit skeptic.  However, when I finally did the research, I found it compelling.  The approach is of particular interest when chronic emotional stress or feelings of anxiety are present.  This Healthline article, What is EFT Tapping, provides a succinct overview.

Now on to the benefits of a little stress!

There is such a thing as “good” stress.  Eustress is the type that energizes us, such as that the comes from various exhilarating experiences.

Also, moderate levels of stress, in our day-to-day lives can actually help us to build resilience, which is the ability to overcome obstacles.  This article in Time, How Some Stress Can Actually Be Good For You, talks to a few experts in psychology about this.  They also point out benefits to motivation, social bonding, and the recognition of purpose in life.

Knowledge of this fact alone can actually be empowering in itself.  It can help us put into perspective how we respond to things and, when things feel a little out of hand, the methodologies detailed above can come in handy!

Want to learn a little more about what to actually do in your life AND come away with a personalized action plan???  Consider joining us for a virtual workshop.  Sign up HERE.

Photo credit:  Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Live Out Your Joy

It was a blast to plan out an Instagram contest with a fellow entrepreneur who takes center on healthful living.  Be sure to follow @theConureLife and @LiveConscientiousLiveHealthful on Instagram to play along.

It starts on February 13th (US time) which also happens to coincide with “National Self Love Day”.

The daily themes center on healthful habits and behaviors that can be easily and consistently addressed, such as hydration, breathing, eliminating negative facets that don’t serve you, movement, and appropriate rest.

Additional ideas for you to “Live Out Your Joy” can be found in this Mind Body Green article, 10 Everyday Choices for a Soul-centered, Joyous Life.  I also love this article written by Eric Barke, How to Live Joyously Like an Old Person, that gains perspective on joy from our elder population.

Feel free to join us!

 

 

Photo credits to @JuicePlus and @WellnessStockShop

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

Support your body to better ward off infection & illness with this recipe

Herbs and spices have various “healing” properties.  They can also play a role in prevention.

Specific profiles will vary, but in general, appropriate usage of herbs and spices in our dietary protocols can make a favorable impact on digestion, circulation, blood sugar regulation, and immune response.  Within the scope of health-beneficial herbs and spices, options such as cinnamon, cloves, and ginger are often revered.  (click on each of them for more info)

I am happy to share this nourishing hot beverage from my mother’s recipe Rolodex.  A true inspiration, she has been steadfast in practicing whole-food, natural-living protocols for many years.

This warming drink comes especially in handy for times that you notice signs and symptoms of a nasty bug coming on, such as a cold or other viral infection.

Start with the following:

  • cinnamon stick (break it up if you can)
  • 1 tsp whole clove buds
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • two large mugs of water

Put the water in a pan and bring to a high boil.  Add cinnamon and clove.  Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes.  Turn off heat and add ginger.  Steep for about 15 more minutes.

Time to get warm and spicy.  Drink up.  Strain the desired amount.  Add lemon juice and honey to taste (optional).  Keep any remaining beverage to sip on later.

Photo credit Wellness Stock Shop #wellnessstockshop @wellnessstockshop

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

How do you Spaghetti Squash?

This is an engagement post.  Please comment.

Personally, I love to make a roasted tomato-garlic-basil base with an arugula saute layered over pre-baked spaghetti squash.  Using this method, you can carve the squash out of the shell onto a plate or simply spoon out the sauce and arugula directly over 1/2 of the cooked squash and scoop it all out like it’s a big bowl itself.

A few other notables that have caught my eye;

Spaghetti Squash Chow Mein by Little Bits Of –  http://littlebitsof.com/2014/10/spaghetti-squash-chow-mein/

Spaghetti Squash Black Bean Bowls by THE glowing FRIDGE – http://www.theglowingfridge.com/spaghetti-squash-black-bean-bowls/#_a5y_p=5905804

Spaghetti Squash Hashbrowns by The Honour System – http://thehonoursystem.com/2015/03/06/spaghetti-squash-hash-browns-vegan-gluten-free/

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

Weekend Skillets

I wanted to devote a post to my latest love…  weekend skillets.

What is this? you might ask.  Well, quite frankly it’s a food smorgasbord that a little extra a.m. time on the weekends allows for.  Basically, you chop up, season, and saute a host of different vegetables to pair with eggs and/or other protein rich source (fish, other meats, or something plant based such as edamame or mushrooms), optional healthy grain or seed sources, such as quinoa, and condiments like hot sauce or salsa.  Top this off with a healthy fat, such as a sliced avocado, and there you have it, a skillet breakfast at it’s best.  Sometimes, depending on flavor combination, I even drizzle a little cold olive oil on top of the finished dish for added savor.  Another skillet option is to combine a cooked base with a topping of fresh, raw ingredients.

As part of my personal protocol, I have been focusing on a concept PFFC balance (protein, fat, fiber, carbohydrates).  Conceptually, this acronym serves as a guiding principle for planning meals, at a macro-nutrient level.  The goal is to apply the principle to each meal and snack through out the day.  When food options are appropriately selected, such as dark leafy greens for the complex carbohydrate category, micronutrient and fiber intake goals can also be achieved.

The science suggests that following an appropriate PFFC balance across meals and snacks throughout the day can contribute to better hormonal balance and blood sugar stabilization.  Therefore, it is further supportive of optimal health though nutrition.  The skillet presents an easy way to make this happen.  I have also learned that if I eat this in the morning, I can go most all day and only need to rely on snacks.  For my fitness and social activity routines on weekends, this is really helpful.

I found the break down PFC Balanced Eating Part 1:  What is PFC? from Dietitian Cassie clear and easy to apply (2016).

The skillet makes planning PFFC easy.  Not only is it fun to prepare and eat, it also allows me to partake in a fantastic life hack!  It might come as no surprise to you that I am fanatic about brown bag lunches.  Not only does this help me stay on track with my nutritional goals, it is a cost-effective measure.  As a customer of a regional CSA (community supported agriculture) share, I am even more committed to coming up with my own food preparation tactics as well as recipes.  What I have learned when making the skillet, I can easily perform extra chopping to be used in other recipes.  Previously I had been committing a pretty significant block of time on Sundays to do all my weekly food preparation.  However, the addition of a skillet breakfast on Saturdays allows me to split of my prep time and has ultimately saved time over all.

Dietitian Cassie also addresses ways to budget this approach to eating on the Healthy Simple Life website, PFC on the CHEAP part 1 (2014).

REFERENCES

Healthy Simple Life. (2014). Retrieved from PFC on the CHEAP part 1: http://healthysimplelife.com/pfc-on-the-cheap-part-1/

PFC Balanced Eating Part 1: What is PFC? (2016). Retrieved from Dietician Cassie. Real Talk. Real Food. Real Life.: http://www.dietitiancassie.com/pfc-balanced-eating-part-1-what-is-pfc/

Vegan Zucchini Gratin | Minimalist Baker Recipes

I was so excited to review this recipe from Minimalist Baker (with credit to my CSA for including in their weekly newsletter, #TomatoMountain).  Such a great Spring recipe.  Kudos for adding a little healthy fat in the cashews.

http://minimalistbaker.com/vegan-zucchini-gratin/

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

More Purple… Recipe Share: Purple Power Salad

If you have noticed a recurring theme of “purple” in my blog, this is no coincidence.  Both red and purple have presented themselves as signature colors in my life.  When I was a little girl, I had to have the pastel lavender option for various toys and products, such as an 80’s style tape recorder “boom box”.  In college, it just so happened I joined a sorority with national colors purple and white, therefore, continuing the theme of purple in my life.  Aside from fashion and home accessories, I love to find the color in nature.  Turns out food is a great place for it (see my 2015 blog post “Blue-Purple”).

…and so, without further delay, another recipe share.  Again, this is inspired by Sarah Britton.  However, as we begin to pull ourselves out of winter and think about Spring, I love to start thinking about salads again.  This one has become a go-to in my life and will, undoubtedly, become a classic as time goes forward.  In addition, the spice and herb focus to the dressing not only brings about a flavorful punch, it is a savvy way to pack in a little extra nutrition.  I highly recommend to try at least a small amount of cayenne pepper, even if you think you don’t like a hot spice.  The cinnamon combination creates a nice balance.  One adjustment I have done in the past is blend figs into the dressing itself.  At certain times of the year, I can find organic green figs in the frozen section for a reasonable price.  Black figs (or Turkish as I most prefer) can be a little pricey.

Enjoy!

http://www.mynewroots.org/site/2013/08/purple-power-salad-for-a-picnic/

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

Purple Power Picnic Salad

 

Recipe share by Sarah Britton – Winter Rainbow Panzanella | My New Roots

One of my favorite food blogs is My New Roots by Sarah Britton, Holistic Nutritionist & CNP.  Fairly recently, she also published a book and last week I discovered it in Whole Foods.

Her work is near to perfect synergy between flavor, nutrition, and food artistry.  She pays special attention to varied food availability or dietary protocols and often provides alternative suggestions.  I relate well to this approach.

Earlier this year, I saved the recipe below to Pinterest.  As we dive into winter, I am reminded of it.  So far my winter CSA has been most regularly dividing up orange and purple carrots, turnips, radishes, a hearty variety of spinach, and a few beets.  #tomatomountain  I can’t help but see making a version of this dish in my near future!

http://www.mynewroots.org/site/2015/03/winter-rainbow-panzanella/

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!