Category Archives: Well-being

Immune Health:  Important things to know (pandemic or not)

Immune health has become more relevant this year.  Perhaps more so than ever before!

No matter how you look at it, there are a few core principles to optimizing immune health.  There are also a few specific science-backed nutrients and nutritional compounds worth considering.  Scroll down to learn more.

First of all, our body is a system and should be treated as so.  One size fits all solutions and quick fixes are rarely the answers for good, life-long health and well-being.  Consistent practices that are realistic and strike a balance across all influencing factors can help to support your success and overall happiness.

Within our internal ecosystem, various checks and balances are continuously at play.  Facets of our lifestyle and environments can make or break the health of these systems.  Let’s explore this a little further.

Inflammation & Oxidative Stress Wreak Havoc on Health

Chances are that you have heard about inflammation, but oxidative stress may be less familiar.  Oxidative stress is a tricky thing that happens within our bodies.  This natural chemical reaction can result from environmental, physical, and mental or emotional stressors within our daily lives.  It also triggers inflammation in the body!

Scientists go back and forth, but generally believe that low levels of oxidative stress (oxidative eustress) could help the body to build internal resilience.  Also, this may be a mechanism to treat diseases like certain types of cancer.

However, when oxidation becomes excessive and chronic, the imbalance is too much.  As a result, the body goes into a bit of an overload and can’t handle it.  This is when oxidative stress can contribute to damage to the cells and tissues within our bodies.  It also reduces the body’s ability to defend itself!

Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the onset of diseases and increases the risk of infections.

Agents in our environment and lifestyles, such as pesticides and air pollution, cigarette smoking, and processed foods are known contributors to oxidative stress.  Antagonistic substances, such as high-fructose corn syrup in food or chemicals in consumer products, may contribute further to the havoc.  Also, our body’s response to overloads of psychological and emotional stressors may induce oxidative stress.

In the modern world, it is pretty safe to assume that excessive levels of oxidative stress will be likely and that measures to combat this threat should be taken.  Also, if you have already developed a chronic condition such as diabetes or autoimmune diseases, then paying attention to sources of oxidative stress will be of utmost importance.

Nutrient-rich, healthy eating is one of the best approaches to oxidative stress.  Anti-inflammatory foods and supplements provide the body the antioxidant boost it craves.  Even better to know, the mitochondria in our cells (our little energy creators) are sensitive to environmental factors and oxidative stress yet respond well to good nutrition.

Other behaviors, such as consistent, moderate-impact exercise, managing psychological and emotional stress, prioritizing sleep, and taking precautions with chemicals, may also support the body to combat the negative effects of oxidative stress.

A Healthy Gut and Immune Health are Linked

Gut health more or less equates to immune health.  An estimated 70% of our immune cells reside in the gastrointestinal tract (aka gut), making it integral to our immune system. 

Our digestive organs and gut bacteria play critical roles in our body’s natural detoxification, hormone regulation, and overall internal defense.  Essentially, when functioning properly, the gut helps us to get rid of what we don’t want and keep what we do. 

Furthermore, research on the human gut microbiome, the bacteria residing in the gastrointestinal tract, has led to critical findings on human health and diseases, including the impact on immune health

Gut bacteria and health outcomes are intricately linked.  In a nutshell, if you fail to nurture the health of the gut, you will also be setting yourself up for poorer immune health. 

Poor food choices and chronic exposure to chemicals and pollutants will burden the gut and contribute to dysfunction in the body.  These factors may also lead to a “leaky gut” where the composition of the gut lining becomes compromised and allow parts of food to escape.  Imbalanced nutrition can also compromise the immune system and leave it more vulnerable to infections.

Intestinal permeability (aka leaky gut) can lead to impaired nutrient absorption and may trigger food sensitivities.  Also, particles that pass through the gut lining will rev up your body’s immune response in an unintended fashion.  When this happens, a range of health problems may result.

Lifestyles that are sedentary or imbalanced may lead to further disruption of a healthy microbiome.  Microbiome disruption contributes to an imbalance within the composition of gut microbiota.  This may lead to a weaker immune system.  This cascade, so to speak, can set you up for the higher likelihood of infections and the manifestation of chronic health conditions.

Essentially, cultivating an environment where your gut and body can effectively operate, then rest and restore itself is the aim.  This can be supported through a consistent, daily focus on enhancing good gut health.

The same measures you would take to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation in the body will help to improve gut health.  A few other things to help boost the health of your gut microbiome include the following:

  • determining if you have any food sensitivities
  • increasing intake of pre- and probiotic foods
  • reducing sugar in your diet
  • increasing fiber intake
  • reducing chemical exposures from products in your day-to-day (skincare, food storage, etc.)

Sleep, Sleep, and More Sleep for Better Health

Sleep deprivation is commonly underlooked.  When life gets busy or hectic, it’s often the first thing that people slough off.  However, based on what we know from sleep science, there is no reason to make such excuses.  Doing so will only short-change yourself and could have significant implications on the health of your immune system.

Sleep is the time within our circadian rhythms that our bodies restore themselves.  Adequate sleep is critical to immune functionality, hormone regulation, and healthy digestion.  (Notice a theme?)

Sleep and immune system health are also intricately linked.  Lack of sleep may lead to the suppression of the immune system and weaken its ability to function. It can also lead to higher inflammation and greater susceptibility to infections.  If sleep deprivation continues over prolonged periods, the body’s defense system will get confused.  This dysregulation may contribute to the onset of chronic health conditions and diseases.

The importance of sleep should not be overlooked.  Good health and sleep habits often go hand in hand.

No one is saying to set up a bear cave for prolonged sleep.  Generally speaking, experts suggest 7-9 hours consistently across your days with the encouragement to keep bed and rise times the same.  People with chronic health conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, may find that 8-10 hours is more conducive for their health and wellness.

Sleep experts support establishing a sleep schedule and supplementation when needed.  Also, reducing the use of technology at least an hour (or more) before your bedtime may prove relevant.  This is due to the blue-toned lighting used in technological devices and the mental stimulation that engaging in certain digital activities may provide.  Finally, keeping social stressors in check may also lead to a better, more effective wind-down process before bedtimes.

The Meaningful Impact of A Healthy Relationship with Stress

Psychological and emotional stress, like oxidative stress, is much about finding a balance.  Some stress in our lives can help challenge us both mentally and physiologically.  However, persistent and enduring stress is what should present some concern.  Long-term mental or emotional stress may result from aspects within our lifestyle or as a result of a traumatic event.

The effects of stress on the immune system have been studied for some time.  Although acute psychological stress, (meaning circumstantial events that challenge us mentally), may provide boosts to the immune system and body’s overall resilience, chronically stressful lifestyles can cause trouble.

Over firing of stress hormones can reduce the effectiveness of the immune system.  Furthermore, researchers believe that chronic stressors may dysregulate the immune system.  This type of stress may contribute to weaker immune systems and a greater likelihood of developing illnesses.  Also, as we age, this risk may become higher.

As one expert describes it, the chronic, less-predictable stress is what throws our bodies out of balance.

Stress hormones and hormone-producing glands naturally spring into action when stress is experienced.  To the body, stressors are like threats to our livelihood that require an immediate response.  It is a natural way for the body to defend itself from what it perceives as threats.  However, this mechanism can also down-regulate some immune functions.  (It’s a little like putting them in reserves so the body can respond to the threat).

With short-term bursts of the body’s natural stress response, a healthy body will rebound.  However, if hormone levels like cortisol stay elevated for prolonged periods then, negative effects within the body will begin to initiate.  This cascade could set the stage for longer-term health consequences.

There are also compelling connections between sleep quality and the effects of psychological and emotional stress.  It’s nearly impossible to discuss one area without address the other.  The dynamic between stress and sleep is codependent.  In a nutshell, sleep deprivation may impair the regulation of stress hormones.  While the dysregulation of hormones that stress can trigger may impair sleep.  Needless to say, it’s an unproductive cycle.

Other stress-related effects on the immune system include increased inflammation, poor wound healing, a change in how the body responds to infectious agents, and impairments to digestion and, including the microbiome.  (Wow, can you see how all these factors are interrelated?!?)

Keeping stressors at bay through stress management, relaxation, and other techniques to calm the body should promote a healthier immune system.  A few options include the following:

  • Meditation and Deep-breathing exercises
  • Mindfulness therapies and/or Mind-body approaches
  • Daily movement, Coordinated exercise, and Yoga
  • Hormonal regulation therapies or supplements
  • Calming techniques such as EFT (tapping)
  • Remaining connected socially (with positive social connections)
  • Having a little fun or Laughter
  • Spending time in nature
  • Snuggling or playing with pets

Final Tips to Boost Immune Health

The areas detailed above are entangled.  Other things we know about keeping the immune system healthy include the following:

Immune system health has a lot of components.

It can be best to take a realistic and measurable approach.  First, do what you can to avoid unnecessary havoc on the immune system (i.e. clean up the junk).

Identifying a few realistic “start small” areas to gradually integrate into your daily life can be an effective strategy.  While other people may find the most success in identifying their most critical area of need and, then, starting to make changes related to it before moving on to other priorities.

Reducing burden or overload on the body while simultaneously boosting its processes and systems will help to support your body for overall health and well-being.

In terms of immune health, this can contribute to the lower risk of infection or improve the body’s ability to better manage infections that occur.  There are no guarantees, but factoring in the facets above and staying on track can increase the likelihood of favorable outcomes.

The good news is that much of the lifestyle measures and behaviors most supportive of good immune health have benefits that extend well beyond the health of the immune system.

Photo credit(s):  Corinne Kutz on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

How to Boost Your Health as a Busy Working Mom

Do you struggle as a busy working mom?  It may seem hard to maintain balance and keep health a priority.

According to the Pew Research Center, mothers are spending more time in the labor force, as compared to prior generations, and many of them report feeling a lot of pressure to find an appropriate balance between their roles as a professional and a parent (2019).

This study summary, published in the Journal of Happiness Studies, honed in on psychological factors related to working mothers.  The researchers concluded that the mother’s sense of well-being dropped when feelings of inadequacy, pressures, or less social connectedness were present (2017).

Some of these feelings could easily arise when a sense of balance is challenged and schedules feel hectic or erratic.  Furthermore, this could lead to overwhelm and be emotional taxing which can increase adverse stress levels.  Also, it could inadvertently put positive self-care and health on the back-burner.

Three ways to bring about a little calm to the chaos and, therefore, recenter focus on balance and good health could include the following;

Establish an iterative routine – Routines can help to keep various facets on the priority list.  They are great when they are realistic.  However, chances are pretty high that, as a busy working mom, there will be the need to incorporate a little flexibility.  Therefore, planning various buffer time or blocking off a few extra time slots in the calendar can help to plan for unexpected interruptions.

Create a personal wellness zone – This is a tactic used in workplace wellness and some may be the lucky ones with access to these companies that provide wellness zones.  However, others may be working from home or amid of work-related travel.  Therefore, a little creativity to set up a tailored wellness zone may be necessary.  This could include designating a place for meditation, finding a quiet area for napping, or structuring a space for a workout.

Leave time to wind down – Sleep is one of the most significant factors in human health.  Yet, it can be easily disrupted as a person’s anxiety levels increase.  Similar to elevated and adverse stress levels, inadequate sleep can wreak havoc on the human body and lead to feeling pretty crumby.  Also, depending on the age of children, there may be uncontrollable disruptions.  Emphasizing good quality sleep when possible can be well-worth the priority.  Finding ways to wind down can help ensure that sleep and times of rest are both adequate and more relevant in quality.

Other tips and tricks to find greater balance and boost health include the following:

  • Prioritize family communication
  • Carefully delegate tasks and to do’s
  • Spend time in nature
  • Leave time for creative thought
  • Use a journal
  • Incorporate mindfulness approaches

Finally, this Thrive Global article, 21 Productivity Hacks for Working Moms, provided a pretty fantastic list of suggestions to help simplify while also getting a lot of things done.

Sense of accomplishment from and contributions made to work can be significant intrinsic motivators as well.  Finding a good balance between this role and other responsibilities, such as that of a parent, can be supportive of good overall health and well-being.

Photo credit(s):  Sue Zeng on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Stress and Well-being are Top of Mind in 2020 {ironically, April is Stress Awareness Month}

Are you concerned about your stress and well-being?

Stress and the sense of worry have catapulted.  The various unexpected circumstances and interruptions this year (2020) have led to significant changes in many people’s lives including daily routines.

All of this sheds further light on stress health.  Times that are riddled with unexpected circumstances can present a great opportunity as well.

It is not uncommon for people, in their busy day-to-day, to put stress health on the back burner.  Yet, excess elevated stress levels that are not appropriately dealt with can cause a cascade of other health-related impairments.

…furthermore, making it more challenging to stay healthy.

This includes interference to our immune health, sleep, physical health, mood, and emotional well-being.  More details can be found from sources such as The American Institute of Stress.

An important concept to understand is that not all stress is bad.  Stressors can help to build resilience and, in a sense, make us stronger.  The New York Times recently published a nice write-up on this facet.

Finding ways to focus on how you respond to stressors in the day-to-day can be well worth the while.  Often, it is just about getting started…  pressing that imaginary “begin” button.

Developing a healthy relationship with stress can catalyze improvements in health and well-being as a whole.

If you are one of those people who have put stress health on the back burner OR need a simple format to get started, I have something for you.

In my service business, I have unlocked a 3-day workshop focused on a “keep it simple” approach to addressing stress in your daily lives.

Visit our News and Updates section to learn more.

Photo credit(s): Hello I’m Nik 🎞 on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

5 Ways Good Wellness Helps to Optimize Your Productivity

There are some compelling connections between good wellness and your overall productivity.

Whether you are a business owner, employee, freelancer, or stay-at-home parent, taking these associations into account may be of significant help to reap certain rewards.  Honing in on good wellness in support of personal productivity can be great for the following:

  • Help you to get things done
  • Contribute to meaningful progress towards your goals
  • Ultimately, lead to a more flawless journey from point A to B when it comes to your Achievements, Desired Outcomes, and other areas of Success

Implementers of workplace wellness offerings have been rather keen on this for years.  Studies on these programs have observed improvements in various productivity measures across the workforce population that were enrolled.  Also, positive changes were shown in both people considered healthy and sick, such as those with at least one chronic health condition.

As an individual, a proactive approach to wellness is certainly an area to consider for both personal health outcomes and productivity-related results.

Poorer health may interfere with the ability to function well.  Furthermore, it can result in certain limitations.  Although not all health conditions are within our immediate control, engaging in wellness programs and activities can help to prevent certain impairments in our health and well-being.

5 ways that good health and wellness can influence productivity include the following;

  1. Improved mental clarity and focus.  People who are in good or better health tend to comment that they also feel better mentally.  Also, certain activities and habits, such as physical activity, meditation, getting sufficient sleep, and eating well can help out our internal biochemistry and the brain which can lead to better memory, executive functioning, and overall cognition.
  2. Stress-reduction and reduced burnout.  Wellness can also support people to learn coping mechanisms for when life puts on the pressure, especially considering that many people are juggling to maintain a good balance across priorities.  The American Institute of Stress has been monitoring facets related to the onset of stress, including work-related factors.  High-stress levels may lead to missed days at work, less focus while completing tasks, and a poorer outlook.  Many health-related activities lead to reduced stress levels.
  3. Greater levels of happiness.  Although complex, research suggests that “happy workers” feel more satisfied and are more productive.  The exact path leading to someone’s happiness includes several factors, however, people participating in various health related-activities and wellness programs report a greater sense of well-being including overall happiness and a favorable outlook on life.  Furthermore, more engagement in healthy activities may also reduce loneliness.
  4. Enhanced motivation and well-being.  Health and wellness as a whole is a great area to plan, work for, track, and achieve goals.  The function of this alone can encourage positive motivation which can have a bit of an amplification effect for other aspects of both productivity and positive well-being.
  5. Fewer unplanned interruptions due to illness.  Better immune health can serve as a catalyst to avoid the onset of illnesses or, at least, reduce the severity.  Certain good health practices can help to take a proactive approach to protect and boost the immune system.

Habits such as nourishing the body through good food, taking breaks for physical activity and social time, leaving time for creativity or creative thought, and getting enough quality sleep are all areas that make up “good wellness”.  A more comprehensive list of suggestions is included in a Thrive Global article focused on correlations between well-being and higher performance.

Photo credit(s):  krisna iv on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

References:

American Institute of Stress, The (n.d.).  Workplace Stress.  Retrieved from https://www.stress.org/workplace-stress.

Gubler, T., Larkin, I., and Pierce, L. (2017, Dec 19).  Doing Well by Making Well: The Impact of Corporate Wellness Programs on Employee Productivity.  Management Science, 64(11), 4967-4987.

Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School (2020, Jan 29).  12 Ways to Keep Your Brain Young.  Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/12-ways-to-keep-your-brain-young.

Krause, W. (2017, May 7).  Wellbeing is Correlated to Higher Performance.  Thrive Global.  Retrieved from https://medium.com/thrive-global/why-well-being-has-everything-to-do-with-productivity-bc89ecc09959.

Peiró, J. M., Kozusznik, M. W., Rodríguez-Molina, I., and Tordera, N. (2019).  The Happy-Productive Worker Model and Beyond: Patterns of Wellbeing and Performance at Work. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health16(3), 479.

Raghupathi, W. and Raghupathi, V.  (2018, Mar).  An Empirical Study of Chronic Diseases in the United States:  A Visual Analytics Approach to Public Health.  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(3), 431.

Nichols, H. (2018, Jan 10).  How to Boost Your Brain.  Medical News Today.  Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320576.php#1.

A Wellness Journal for Your Best, Healthy Life

A wellness journal can be important in achieving your goals.

The use of a journal can help to Clear the mind, allow for Self-reflection and Emotional expression, Provide accountability, Reduce stress, and improve overall Problem-solving.  It can be supportive of personal growth and may lead to a greater sense of empowerment in one’s life.

It is also considered an inexpensive form of self-care!

Writing therapy with the use of a journal has been used in a range of scenarios related to overall health and wellness.  Essentially what can make journaling supportive to health is when it is leveraged in a concerted way.  More on this can be found through PositivePsychology.com under “writing therapy”.  Also, a brief synopsis on the history of journal writing as a form of therapy is available from the Center for Journal Therapy.

In scientific studies, various associations between creative expression and health outcomes have been observed.

Self-reflection exercises, such as those that can be applied through the use of a journal, have been used to support people in overcoming grief or trauma.  The rationale behind this is that expressive writing can help people to acknowledge traumatic events, organize thoughts, and, then, help them to make sense of things.  Essentially, it is a way to learn from the experience and move forward.  Experts in this area point out the need to find the right amount of time spent on journaling vs. over-reliance on the tool which could result in rumination.

Studies that have focused on people with chronic health conditions have shown improvements in overall well-being even if the act of journaling was only once a week.  Furthermore, there has been some evidence to suggest the simple act of using a journal can boost the immune system and, therefore, benefit health overall.  This could have been a bi-product resulting from stress reduction.

Improving immune health is especially relevant when health conditions have been diagnosed.  

For general wellness and personal growth, journals can be used to create healthy habits.  A few ways in which a journal is supportive for goal setting and forming habits include;

  • Definition and visualization of goals
  • Organization of information and supportive details
  • A catalyst to plan necessary steps and your time
  • Leverage of self-accountability and check-ins

Furthermore, the use of a journal can be a great way to notice patterns in your behavior and possible triggers that throw you off track.

When incorporating health and wellness into your journal, you can also use sections to monitor Food and Water intake, Sleep or fatigue, Exercise, Self-care, and factors or symptoms associated with a health condition.

Using a wellness journal is not only a good way to plan out your favorite healthy activities, but also to draft and track other personal goals, such as those related to Productivity, Altruism or Volunteerism, and/or Relationships.

In my wellness practice, I leverage a symptoms journal approach that also incorporates factors related to well-being.  It never ceases to amaze me how quickly participants will notice something they hadn’t before completing the journaling exercise.  Recently, I added a simple journal tool for general health and wellness.  It is conveniently named Live Your Best, Healthy Life!

Photo credit(s):  Wellness Stock Shop

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Sources:

Ackerman, C.E.  (2019, Nov 20).  Writing Therapy:  Using a Pen and Paper to Enhance Personal Growth.  PositivePsychology.com.  Retrieved from https://positivepsychology.com/writing-therapy/.

Baikie, K.A. and Wilhelm, K.  (2005, Sep).  Emotional and Physical Health Benefits of Expressive Writing.  Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 11(5), 338-346.

Center for Journal Therapy  (n.d.).  A Brief History of Journal Writing.  Retrieved from https://journaltherapy.com/get-training/short-program-journal-to-the-self/journal-to-the-self/journal-writing-history/.

Murray, B.  (2002, Jun).  Writing to Heal:  By Helping People Manage and Learn from Negative Experiences, Writing Strengthens Their Immune Systems As Well As Their Minds.  American Psychological Association, Monitor on Psychology, 33(6), 54.

O’Connor, M.  (n.d.).  Evidence of the Healing Power of Expressive Writing.  The Foundation for Art and Healing, The UnLonely Project.  Retrieved from https://artandhealing.org/evidence-of-the-healing-power-of-expressive-writing/.

Pennebaker, J. W. and Smyth, J.M.  (2016).  Opening Up by Writing it Down:  How Expressive Writing Improves Health and Eases Emotional Pain, (3rd edition), New York, NY:  The Guilford Press.

Smyth, J.M., Stone, A.A., Hurewitz, A., and Kaell, A.  (1999, Apr 14).  Effects of Writing About Stressful Experiences on Symptom Reduction in Patients with Asthma or Rheumatoid Arthritis:  A Randomized Trial.  Journal of American Medical Association, 281(14), 1304-09.

Prioritizing Your Health and Finances To Get The Most Out of Life

Taking care of yourself, including both health and finances, is a sure-fire way to cultivate various positive aspects of your life.  Financial health is a critical element within self-care.  A positive stance for financial wellness can expand your abilities, contributions, and impact you have on others.

There are a fair amount of psycho- and sociological factors and, often, stigmas around making financial decisions that can be rather entangled.  Regardless, mental, physical, and financial health are inextricably linked.  Therefore, it’s worth placing focus on this area as part of a proactive approach to leading an overall healthful life.

Financial worry can set off a cascade of challenges.

In many people, it can lead to chronic stress which, furthermore, can impair sleep, lead to greater levels of anxiety or states of depression, may influence self-esteem, and could trigger less healthful behaviors.  Furthermore, psychological distress and negative emotions may indirectly contribute to increased inflammation in the body, higher blood pressure, and the onset of other chronic health conditions.

Financial stress could even inhibit seeking out appropriate care in the first place.  According to the American Psychological Association, the cost of health care is a leading concern and cause for stress (2019).

Essentially, financial stress can be disruptive in nature.  However, there are facets that can help the mental-emotional relationship to finances.  Like any other aspect of life and goal-setting, expectations should be realistic.  It may also be beneficial to take self-inventory for how you make decisions.

One review of five studies suggested that “affective decision-makers” may be more likely to avoid making decisions related to financial matters.  This was due, in part, to the perception that decisions related to finances are very analytical in nature.  Affective thinking has lent towards having a distinct sense of feeling or emotion present when making decisions.  Affective decision-makers may have considered financial decisions “cold” in nature and, therefore, less relatable.  Furthermore, the complexities of financial products and instruments could have been intimidating (Park and Sela, 2017).

It is not to assume that affective thinking is inefficient and absolutely leads to a less proactive approach to finances, but it could be important to understand where you fall on the spectrum in case this is a mediating factor.

Ignoring your finances can create more money problems and increase the resulting stress.  Acknowledging and accepting any negative feelings you may have about dealing with your money is a critical step.

Other areas that studies have shown to be influential include the following:

  • one’s social environment and/or level of emotional support
  • relationships and social standings within communities
  • previous experiences with financial stressors

According to Gallup-Sharecare, five essential elements of well-being include:

  • sense of purpose, including within a career path
  • social relationships
  • financial security
  • relationship to community
  • physical health

Furthermore, they have defined “financial” as managing your economic life to reduce stress and increase security.

Like with any big challenge, breaking out small, actionable steps and a clear timeline can be beneficial.  Working with appropriate professionals, including both those with financial expertise and emotional health resources (or therapeutic options), can help to refine your perspective and address any blocks in the mindset.

As experts will point out, this area is complex and laced with emotional drivers.  There is also a difference between knowing what to do and understanding how to do it.

Not all support options have to cost an arm and a leg.

Many cities and towns have finance-related programs through their city/public affairs divisions or library systems.  Meanwhile, a hack to mental health is seeing a psychologist in training who will be under supervision but have more nominal fees.

Although exact financial circumstances will vary from person to person.  Taking steps to ensure financial behaviors are healthful can help to reduce mental fog from financial stress and, therefore, lead to a greater level of productivity.  It can help you move forward and feel more positive about what’s to come in life.

Photo credit(s):  Fabian Blank on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

References:

American Psychological Association (Nov, 2019).  Stress in America 2019.  Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2019/stress-america-2019.pdf.

American Psychological Association (2015, Feb 4).  Stress in America, Paying with our Health.  Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2014/stress-report.pdf.

Connolly, M. and Slade, M. (2019, May 7).  The United States of Stress 2019, Special Report.  Everyday Health.  Retrieved from https://www.everydayhealth.com/wellness/united-states-of-stress/.

Gallup-Sharecare Well-being Index (2017).  State of American Well-being, 2017 State Well-being Rankings.  Retrieved from https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Gallup-Sharecare-State-of-American-Well-Being_2017-State-Rankings_FINAL.pdf.

Park, J.J. and Sela, A. (2018, Aug).  Not My Type:  Why Affective Decision Makers Are Reluctant to Make Financial Decisions.  Journal of Consumer Research, 45(2), 298-319.

Sturgeon, J.A., et al.  (2016).  The Psychosocial Context of Financial Stress:  Implications for Inflammation and Psychological Health.  Psychosomatic Medicine, 78(2), 134-143.

3 Simple Ways to Improve both Mental and Physical Health (plus bonus tips)

“Mental health and physical health have a bi-directional and complex relationship” (Bhugra, Kar, and Lawton-Smith, 2014). 

Essentially what that alludes to is how our thought patterns, feelings, and attitudes can influence certain things in the physical realm, such as biological factors and outcomes, just as what we do physically can influence our mental state. The landscape for this topic is further entangled by various social factors.  Studies on the neuroscience involved with the tight connections between mental and physical health are emerging and the findings have been compelling.    

In a nutshell, the intricate dance between mental and physical health plays a significant role in our overall health and sense of well-being.  While it’s easy to get caught up with visuals and images of fit, tone bodies as a representation of good health.  It is also important to keep the health of our mind in check which also takes consistent “exercise”.

The good news is that there are ways to manage both mental and physical health in tandem throughout the year.

Pick a physical activity plan right for you with a focus on consistent daily movement and conditioning.

Movement improves circulation and, respectively, blood flow to the brain.  There is also a co-dependent relationship between physical activity and stress levels.  Appropriate daily movement can help reduce adverse stress levels which can lead to better mental clarity and focus.  Furthermore, exercise can also serve as a moving meditation allowing for concentration on the patterns of movement.  Each of these factors, physical activity and stress levels, influences how we sleep which is incredibly relevant for cognition and certain biochemical facets related to the health of our brain.

Bottom line:  stay physically active for both mental and physical health.

Bonus tip:  Lift weights to reduce anxiety!  Not only is weight-bearing exercise fantastic for your physique, including internal components such as bone health, but it can also be great for mental health as well.

Check-in on your mental patterns and habits. 

Destructive mental habits, such as repetitive self-pity or ruminating, can essentially hijack positive motivations.  When this occurs, it may prevent taking relevant action when doing so is needed the most.  It can also influence our health-related behaviors and outcomes, as well as relationships with others.

Working to re-prioritize mental tendencies and maladaptive behaviors to, then, focus on the proactive practice of more healthful patterns can enhance emotional well-being.  Furthermore, studies have suggested, for example, that exercises for mindfulness can be a helpful antidote to negative mental tendencies such as rumination.

Bottom line:  clearing negative, adverse mental patterns can positively influence a sense of well-being and lead to a greater sense of motivation which is critical when it comes to taking care of both mental and physical aspects of health.

Bonus tip:  Identifying and repositioning mental habits is also an area where a mentor or appropriate supportive professional can help with identify realistic and actionable steps for change, then support for staying on track.

Pay attention to breathing patterns and consider targeted approaches.

Appropriate breathing patterns are important during exercise and they can also play a role within the day to day through the activation of the relaxation response.  Targeted breathing patterns, such as mechanisms of deep breathing, are also thought to help improve blood flow, relax muscles, support metabolism, regulate the immune system, and reduce stress levels.  Incorporating targeted approaches to breathwork has not only been shown to support various mental related conditions, such as anxiety or depression, but it has also been influential in chronic medical conditions that may be impairing physical health.  Furthermore, the practice of yoga has been touted for its emphasis on breathing and physical conditioning.

Bottom line:  breathing techniques can be supportive of both mental and physical health, particularly due to the reduction of adverse, elevated stress levels.

Bonus tip:  Harvard Health provides a simple, implementable approach HERE.

Final thoughts

Winding down through methods such as spending time in nature or taking a “digital detox” can also be influential to both mental and physical health.  Also, general wellness, including nutrition, is supportive.

In closing, the focus of mind-body connections is emerging in emphasis.  Although certain principles have been around in sort of old-world wisdom for centuries, new research in areas such as neuroscience is further confirming the various connecting facets.

A solid, “whole-health” approach is to exercise both the mind and body.

Photo credit(s):  Jacob Postuma on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

Sources:

Bhugra, D., Kar, A., and Lawton-Smith, S. (2014, Jun).  Integration of Mental and Physical Health Services: Lessons.  Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Mental Health 1(1), 15-21.

Cherry, K. (2019, Sep 30).  Reasons to Do a Digital Detox?  Verywell Mind.  Retrieved from https://www.verywellmind.com/why-and-how-to-do-a-digital-detox-4771321.

Chopra Center, The. (2018, Oct 24).  How Breathwork Benefits the Mind, Body, and Spirit.  Retrieved from https://chopra.com/articles/how-breathwork-benefits-the-mind-body-and-spirit.

Connor, P. J., Herring, M. P., and Caravalho, A. (2010, May 7).  Mental Health Benefits of Strength Training in Adults.  American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 4(5), 377-396.

Gordon, B. R., McDowell, C. P., Lyons, M., and Herring, M.P. (2017, Dec).  The Effects of Resistance Exercise Training on Anxiety:  A Meta-analysis and Meta-regression Analysis of Randomized Control Trials.  Sports Medicine, 47(12), 2521-2532.

Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley. (n.d.).  Mindfulness|Defined.  Retrieved from https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition.

Harvard Health (2018, Apr 13).  Relaxation Techniques:  Breath Control Helps Quell Errant Stress Response.  Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/relaxation-techniques-breath-control-helps-quell-errant-stress-response.

Kleckner, I. R., et al. (2017, Apr 24).  Evidence for a large-scale brain system supporting allostasis and interoception in humans.  Nature Human Behaviour, 1 (0069).

Madell, R. (2016, Mar 14).  Exercise as Stress Relief.  Healthline.  Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/exercise-stress-relief#1.

Palma, Z. (2019, Aug 12).  What is Breathwork and Does It Work?  Parsley Health Articles.  Retrieved from https://www.parsleyhealth.com/blog/breathwork-does-it-work.

Rupprecht S., Walach H. (2016).  Mindfulness at Work: How Mindfulness Training May Change the Way We Work.  In: Wiencke M., Cacace M., Fischer S. (eds) Healthy at Work, (311-327).  Switzerland:  Springer International Publishing.

Sartini-Cprek, N. (2017, Apr  12).  The Mind-Body Connection:  How Mental and Physical Wellness Are Linked.  Good Therapy Blog.  Retrieved from https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/mind-body-connection-how-mental-physical-wellness-are-linked-0412174.

Semeco, A. (2017, Feb 10).  The Top 10 Benefits of Regular Exercise.  Healthline.  Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-benefits-of-exercise.

Sultanoff, B. A. (2002).  Breath Work.  In: Shannon, S. (eds) Handbook of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Mental Health, (209-227).  Elsevier, Inc.

Vago, D. R. (2014, Jan).  Mapping Modalities of Self-Awareness in Mindfulness Practice:  A Potential Mechanism for Clarifying Habits of Mind.  Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1307(1), 28-42.

Verplanken, B. and Fisher, N. (2014, Oct).  Habitual Worrying and Benefits of Mindfulness. Mindfulness, 5566–573.

Verplanken, B., Friborg, O., Wang, C. E., Trafimow, D., & Woolf, K. (2007).  Mental habits: Metacognitive reflection on negative self-thinking.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92(3), 526–541.

US Department of Health and Human Services|National Institutes of Health. (n.d.).  Why Should Scientists Study Neuroscience?  Retrieved from https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/neuro/conditioninfo/study.

Your health and stress: What you can do

It’s not uncommon to have some awareness of the impact of stress on health, yet not really know what to do about it.

There are, in fact, several things we can do within our daily lives to reduce stress and, therefore, create a more balanced and well life.  It is also intriguing that there are some favorable outcomes from certain levels of stress which I’ll highlight further in this post.

I do want to point out that when I’m talking about reducing stress, I am referring to “adverse” stress.  In layman’s terms, this could be considered the “bad” stress.

Self-care is one of the most basic approaches to stress management.

Yep, it’s actually rather simple.  Take care of yourself in a holistic manner and you can pretty much bet on less physical, mental, and emotional stress.

What does that mean???

At a base level, I am talking about healthfulness in terms of food and diet, physical activity, conditioning the mind, relationships, spiritual or connection to purpose, and engagement with finances.  Some people may recognize this as the dimensions of wellness.

Thinking more comprehensively is when we get to pull it all together in a way that brings us balance despite the various ebbs and flows we will encounter.  Furthermore, recognizing that this will take a proactive approach to how we go about life and respond to circumstances as they arise.

For a few examples of specific self-care practices, be sure to check out this article from Very Well Mind, 5 Self-Care Practices for Every Area of Your Life.

Bottomline; prioritize the care of your health and overall wellness to also reduce the likelihood of heightened, chronic adverse stress.

If you are looking for a therapeutically oriented approach with notable evidence to back it up, then Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is likely for you.  This may also fall under Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT).

The term mindfulness may seem a little elusive.  I have seen it explained as anything from “relaxing the mind” to something such as “openness to experience with grounding in the body” which can likely have a wild range of interpretations for meaning.

A textbook definition hones in on self-awareness and recognition for how one responds to circumstances while in the specific moment(s) in which they arise.

In research, which mostly falls under Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in fields such as psychology,  we have observed that certain shifts in the mindset paired with an emphasis on practicing self-compassion have been positively correlated to stress reduction.  Studies have also shown compelling information with regards to a reduction in feelings of “burn out”.

Furthermore, the reduction of adverse stress in our daily lives has been considered with regards to the quality of life factors, such as productivity, health outcomes, leisure and social interactions, and certain socio-economic aspects.

Meanwhile, meditation practices have been around for centuries and are often relied upon for the management of stress.  In fact, if you run a web search on mindfulness or self-care for that matter, many of the results for exercises to complete will include meditation as a suggestion.

With a significant emphasis on breathwork, meditative practices are considered mind-body therapies.  Breathing practices can help disengage the brain from negative responses, such as mind racing, and bring a greater sense of focus.

Furthermore, there is a connection with breathing patterns to the nervous system.  Approaches considerate of this, such as meditation exercises, are thought to relax the nervous system.  This can help bring the body out of a heightened response state and, therefore, reduce excess stress response as well as other respective adverse effects such as consequences to the immune system.

Studies of brain mechanisms and meditation are emerging, but we are seeing much more integration of meditation into both professional and social settings centered on wellness or well-being and certain clinical care settings.

Finally, a somewhat unique, emerging option is Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT).  Admittedly, when I first started hearing hype about this approach, I was a bit skeptic.  However, when I finally did the research, I found it compelling.  The approach is of particular interest when chronic emotional stress or feelings of anxiety are present.  This Healthline article, What is EFT Tapping, provides a succinct overview.

Now on to the benefits of a little stress!

There is such a thing as “good” stress.  Eustress is the type that energizes us, such as that the comes from various exhilarating experiences.

Also, moderate levels of stress, in our day-to-day lives can actually help us to build resilience, which is the ability to overcome obstacles.  This article in Time, How Some Stress Can Actually Be Good For You, talks to a few experts in psychology about this.  They also point out benefits to motivation, social bonding, and the recognition of purpose in life.

Knowledge of this fact alone can actually be empowering in itself.  It can help us put into perspective how we respond to things and, when things feel a little out of hand, the methodologies detailed above can come in handy!

Want to learn a little more about what to actually do in your life AND come away with a personalized action plan???  Consider joining us for a virtual workshop.  Sign up HERE.

Photo credit:  Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

“Life by Design”?!? …Pulling back the curtain on this buzzy concept

The phrase Life by Design seems to be thrown around quite a bit these days.  However, what the heck does it mean?  …or, perhaps, should it mean?

The perception of life by design can easily be swayed by lofty posts on photo sharing and marketing sites (you know the ones) of excess photos from beach walks, coffee breaks on decks with breathtaking scenery, and/or work on a laptop in a picturesque setting that is more or less polar opposite to an office.

Although these images are certainly inspiring and pretty to look at, they may not be representative of entirely realistic goals for everyone.

So what IS… realistic in thinking about a “life by design”?   

Essentially, life by design is an approach to mindful living with respect to overall well-being for one’s self as well as their influence on others.  Often this would consider how one eats, spends time, thinks, and outwardly behaves.  It may also include how and where money is spent.

A positive life by design typically consists of specific intentions and a heightened self-awareness for one’s abilities, strengths, weaknesses, and inter-relationships with others.  Meanwhile, as further illustrated in this Inc article, Do These 5 Things to Live Life by Your Own Design, it also emphasizes not playing a victim’s role.

However, most of all, it’s realistic.  Instead of a fantasy, it’s more of a grounded perspective on or a mindset for one’s circumstances which ultimately influences personal behavior, conduct, and/or engagement with the world.

…and, how can you make the shift?!?

A few steps to take in the shift to a more positive Life by Design are;

Identify your why or why’s:  This is likely the most cliche, yet relevant step in any personal or professional development plan.  However, there is a legitimate reason to give this significant priority.

People with a strong sense of purpose typically live happier and less stressful as well as have stronger relationships or bonds with others.  In fact, it is a key pillar in the Blue Zones Project, a world-wide, geographical research initiative centered on groups of people with most favorable health outcomes.

A simple way to integrate this into your life is to find time for self-reflection and write a few things down.  This can be a consistent placeholder on the calendar or something you do when the thought strikes you in some sort of easily accessible journaling tool.

Set realistic goals:  There are more than one valid frameworks to set great goals, aims, or objectives.  One option that coaches love is the SMART goal framework (click for a worksheet from the University of San Diego).  The approach has been leveraged in numerous evidence-based behavior change programs, is easy to teach and implement, and, best of all, “smart” is more than just an acronym!  The framework can help break down overarching goals into actionable steps which can be oriented towards daily, weekly, monthly or annually.

The art, so to speak, is to set goals, aims, and objectives that are both intentional and creative.  This is where visualization tools can come in handy.  We have likely all seen those vision board parties…  you get the idea!  Focus on where you can thrive vs get bogged down or riddled by bottlenecks in productivity.

Great times for goal setting and/or review are at the end or start of a year and some version of a mid-point to the increment of time that you are trying to achieve the goal.  Finding time and space where you can be clear of distractions, think creatively, and have sufficient duration for a full brainstorm.

Identify how you are spending your time:  This more or less boils down to making determinations for when you are operating on auto-pilot and, perhaps, not actually productive.  What are your power hours?  When do you feel most creative?  Furthermore, are you including time to focus on your passions, causes you wish to support, and relationships?

Once you have answers to these type of questions, you can shift your projects on your calendar around to best meet your personal tendencies and better fit to desired outcomes.  Bundling tasks that are synergistic with one another is also a great tactic.

My resourceful friend Janet, owner of Aligned Biz Systems, has even more tips and tricks on her company blog.

Reframe obstacles or challenges:  A significant facet to life by design is how you respond to your specific circumstances.  Behavior results from a combination of conscious and subconscious minds.

The subconscious essentially catalogs all the information you have been exposed to and experiences you have had across the course of your life.  It is typically more influential than many people realize.  Counseling Psychologist, Christiana Star, discusses this further in her Thrive Global submission, How Your Subconscious Beliefs Affect Your Life.

Reflection on how you have responded to hard times or circumstances in the past can help to illustrate tendencies.  This Mind Body Green article, Out-smart Self-sabotage: 5 Steps to Change Subconscious Beliefs, sheds more light on this.

A basic reframe tactic is to recognize setbacks as key lessons learned or stepping stones.  Furthermore, clear and transparent identification of what gets in your way can help determine where a little personal development and growth work may be relevant.

Be open to support when needed:  “Superwoman” or “superman” may be fun to watch on tv or in the theater, but is completely fictitious.  At some point, we all need a little support to balance our potential weaknesses or challenges we may be facing.  Most of all, accountability can help us stay on track and accomplish things.

This HuffPost article, Life by Design, Not by Default, presents a light-hearted, yet likely relatable story of “falling on her face” a few times.  Yet, details further the intricacy behind making a positive “life by design” a priority including surrounding yourself with positive examples.

Finally… define your version of success!  (BONUS TIP: this may not be the status quo!)

Photo by Danielle MacInnes on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!

In need of formalized support to make healthful lifestyle changes?  Contact me through my business site.

 

Journey with Network Chiropractic Care

Have you heard of network chiropractic care?  If you answered, “no”, you are likely not alone.

Network Chiropractic Care, otherwise known as Network Spinal Analysis (NSA), is a gentle touch approach that nurtures the nervous system.  The emphasis on a reset is multi-faceted across physiological and mental/emotional health.

The intervention occurs through spinal cord adjustments that support a re-organization of the tension within the nervous system.  Its aim is to shift out of a stress-based state towards more optimal functionality.  A more thorough synthesis is provided on Daocloud HERE.

It is EXTREMELY important to consider the health of your nervous system.  The nervous system is tied into so many other areas including hormonal regulation, detoxification pathways, and digestive health, then, of course, the brain!

I had been passively looking for a chiropractor with a focus on gentle applications.  Admittedly, I had been doing just about everything else for good health, but keeping this type of treatment on the back-burner.  Until recently, I didn’t realize that the gentle approach that I was looking for would equate to NSA.  However, upon the introduction, I was immediately drawn to the concept.

In the Functional Medicine community, we frequently talk about neurology and respective tie-ins to overall health.  The nervous system (or systems, because there are different components to the master system) is a foundational system imperative for both structural health and overall well-being, yet may be under-emphasized in personal approaches to wellness.

In February of this year (2019), I started my journey with Network Chiropractic Care.  The timing was a little off due to some pre-established travel plans, but like with anything in life, there never really is a perfect time and sometimes we just need to dive in.

I wasn’t expecting favorable results from my initial scan, but I was also surprised at how much tension I was actually carrying.  Therefore, after wrapping up my travel, I returned in March to enroll in a 3-month intensive.  (The specific practice I enrolled can be accessed HERE).

At this point, I’m a few weeks into my care plan.  It will be an exciting update down the road upon completion of the intensive.  However, for now, a few initial observations are as follows;

  • Most of the applications are very, very light in touch.  It’s is nothing like getting a massage.  However, it is amazing how relaxed your muscles feel after a session.
  • For now, I’m still dealing with tension and tightness that returns, sometimes in little as a few hours to a day after a session, but, so far, the treatments have made me MUCH more aware of how I engage with my body.  Operating in a subconscious, auto-pilot sort of way, I have realized how often I have been twisting and contorting throughout the day and evening, particularly around the shoulder and upper back area.
  • The relationship between neurology and breathing is even more clear.  I have been aware of this mind-body connection area for quite some time.  It appears in so many healing modalities from meditation to yoga to visual frameworks, such as guided imagery.  However, in the NSA framework, you really feel it.  A minor touch on a specific point can almost immediately shift your breath.  I would like to think this is a release within the body and further demonstration of what is working.  To be continued…

I would love to share more about my journey with Network Chiropractic Care.  Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me to learn more about the experiences and insights I have had thus far.

In the meantime, a few additional resources are below;

New Day Network Wellness

Information on Daocloud

Family Network Chiropractic, About NSA™, Network Spinal Analysis

A free directory of providers

Epienergetics website

*Photo by Stuart Poulton on Unsplash

Ashley L Arnold, MBA, MPH is a lifestyle health educator and coach who supports clients to channel authority over their health, well-being, and overall vitality.  Offering health education approaches and 1-on-1 coaching modules, she gets them out of excess weeds of information and inconsistent practices that don’t get desired results.  Through helping people focus on the right applications paired with appropriate consideration for bio-individual facets, they become stronger, more confident self-advocates for their health.  Bottom line, they will surpass challenges, embrace healthful living with ease, and, best of all, feel a greater sense of empowerment and more energy!